Distinguished Concerts International New York (DCINY) presents Mercer University at Carnegie Hall in Review

Distinguished Concerts International New York (DCINY) presents Mercer University at Carnegie Hall in Review

Distinguished Concerts International New York (DCINY) presents Mercer University at Carnegie Hall
Mercer Singers
Stanley L. Roberts, conductor; Carol S. Goff, accompanist
McDuffie Center String Ensemble
Amy Schwartz Moretti, director and violin
Olivia McMillan, soprano
Stern Auditorium at Carnegie Hall, New York, NY
February 19, 2017

 

The nightcap of the President’s Day weekend concert doubleheader presented by Distinguished Concerts International New York (DCINY) featured the talents of musicians from Mercer University, located in Macon, Georgia. William Underwood, President of Mercer University, came to the stage to “throw out the first pitch” by welcoming the audience, talking briefly about Mercer, and expressing his pride in the Mercer music department. He thanked all for coming, asked all to enjoy the concerts, and then left the stage.

The Mercer Singers, led by Stanley L. Roberts took the stage to open the concert. They offered six works in a wide range of styles, highlighting their versatility. Things got off to a good start with the Kenyan folk song Wana Baraka. Complete with the singers swaying to the music, it was moving in its simplicity. Eric Whitacre’s Lux Aurumque followed. This work is deceptively simple, but it requires extreme precision in ensemble balance and intonation, or else the overall effect is ruined. There was no danger of that here, as the balance was superb, with the close intervals precisely rendered. It was an excellent performance. Special mention goes to the soprano soloist, whose voice soared in a way I have not encountered in this work. After this, the Mercer Singers delivered an “adrenaline shot” in the form of Brent Pierce’s Hosanna in excelsis, a two-minute jazz influenced, rhythmically power-packed piece. Faire is the Heaven, by William Henry Harrison, followed with refinement, and Dan Forrest’s setting of Lead, Kindly Light, was the highlight of their selections to this listener. Ending with Moses Hogan’s show-stopping The Battle of Jericho, the Mercer Singers brought the audience to their feet with a rollicking performance.

After intermission, the McDuffie Center String Ensemble took the stage. Led by Amy Schwartz Moretti, who also plays violin in the ensemble, the Mc Duffie Center String Ensemble is composed of twenty-four full scholarship students of the Robert McDuffie Center for Strings, and five faculty mentors. This gives the young players the opportunity to play with and learn from experienced veterans who play with some top-notch ensembles. They offered two selections, Edward Elgar’s Serenade for String Orchestra, Op. 20, and the fourth movement finale from Felix Mendelssohn’s Octet.

The conductor-less ensemble, with the violins and violas playing standing, proved to be a exceptional group. The benefits of playing with accomplished mentors lent wings to the younger players in what were inspired performances. The Elgar was played with polish throughout, but I must give preference to the second movement Larghetto, which was simply sublime. The Presto of the Octet followed – the finale of a masterpiece from one of the greatest prodigies in the history of music, Mendelssohn having written this work at age sixteen! It was played with considerable brio. It was not perfect, to be sure, but the bold approach was something this listener always appreciates, and was worthy of the work. I would in fact like to hear this ensemble play the entire Octet. The audience gave the players a richly rewarded standing ovation.

After a short break, the Mercer Singers joined the String Ensemble (both with the help of some “Friends and Alums”) for the finale work of the night, John Rutter’s Requiem. This seven-movement work was inspired in a large part by Rutter’s editing of a new edition Fauré’s Requiem in 1983. It can be said that Rutter’s study of Fauré led to the creation of an equally serene and beautiful work. Rutter used texts from the Latin Requiem Mass, the 1611 Bible, and the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.

There was much to commend in this performance, but I will mention above all the heavenly Pie Jesu, highlighted by the sheer radiance of the voice of soprano soloist Olivia McMillan. The audience, who broke convention with applause after each movement, gave a prolonged standing ovation at the end. Congratulations to all for a fine evening of music.